Cheryl Barrymore - Biography - Death

Death

After her split with Barrymore, Cheryl's health suffered. In 2003 she suffered a burst ulcer, and in late 2004 she was investigated for Chronic fatigue syndrome, when she complained of feeling unwell.

On 1 April 2005, Cheryl Barrymore died, aged 55, at St John and St Elizabeth Hospital in St John's Wood, having been diagnosed with lung cancer just six weeks earlier.

Read more about this topic:  Cheryl Barrymore, Biography

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