Chepstow

Chepstow (Welsh: Cas-gwent) is a town in Monmouthshire, Wales, adjoining the border with Gloucestershire, England. It is located on the River Wye, about 2 miles (3.2 km) above its confluence with the River Severn, and adjoining the western end of the Severn Bridge. It is 16 miles (26 km) east of Newport and 110 miles (180 km) west of London.

Chepstow Castle, situated on a clifftop above the Wye and its bridge, is often cited as the oldest surviving stone castle in Britain. The castle was established by William fitzOsbern immediately after the Norman conquest, and was extended in later centuries before becoming ruined after the Civil War. A Benedictine priory was also established within the walled town, which was the centre of the Marcher lordship of Striguil. The port of Chepstow became noted in the Middle Ages for its imports of wine, and also became a major centre for the export of timber and bark, from nearby woodland in the Wye valley and Forest of Dean. In the late eighteenth century the town was a focus of early tourism as part of the "Wye Tour", and the tourist industry remains important. Other important industries included shipbuilding - one of the First World War National Shipyards was established in the town - and heavy engineering, including the prefabrication of bridges and, now, wind turbine towers. Chepstow is also well known for its racecourse, which has hosted the Welsh National each year since 1949.

The town had a population of 10,821 according to the 2001 census. It is served by the M48 motorway, and its accessibility to Bristol and Cardiff has led to the growth of commuting. It is administered as part of Monmouthshire County Council, and is within the Monmouth parliamentary constituency and Wales Assembly constituency. Chepstow is on the western bank of the Wye, while adjoining villages on the eastern bank of the river, Tutshill and Sedbury, are located in England.

Read more about ChepstowOrigins of The Name, Geography, Governance, Economy, Transport, Demography, Education and Health, Religion, Culture and Regular Events, Sport and Leisure, Landmarks, Notable People, Gallery

Other articles related to "chepstow":

South Wales Railway - Chronology
... Wales Railway authorised by Act of Parliament from Chepstow to Fishguard 1846 Gloucester and Dean Forest Railway authorised by Act of Parliament 1850 Opened Chepstow to Swansea ...
Chepstow - Gallery
... Remains of Neolithic chambered tomb at Thornwell The castle, pictured from the footpath through the Dell, part of the Wye Valley Walk The Great Tower of the castle, above the Wye Twelfth century wooden door at the castle The castle and Riverside gardens Decorative ironwork on the Wye bridge Part of the Port Wall St Mary's Priory Church The town centre and war memorial Continental market in the High Street Hocker Hill Street, an old cobbled street in the town centre Heritage Trail information plaque, one of many located around the town Houses in Hardwick Garden City The start (and finish) point of the Wales Coast Path at Chepstow. ...
Chepstow Museum - Location
... Chepstow Museum is located close to the town centre, opposite Chepstow Castle in Bridge Street, near the River Wye ... In 1921 it became the Chepstow District Hospital, before being converted into the town museum in 1982 ...
Two Rivers Festival
... Rivers Festival is an annual folk music and morris dancing festival held in July in Chepstow, South Wales ... and includes free events in the town and concerts inside Chepstow Castle and Chepstow Racecourse ...
St Mary's Church, Chepstow - The Present Building
... Charles I's death warrant, who was imprisoned in Chepstow Castle until his death in 1680 ... Gloucester Cathedral before being moved to Bristol Cathedral in 1663 and then to Chepstow possibly as early as 1685, and certainly by the 18th century ... bells in the tower date from 1735 and were made in Chepstow by William Evans the two lightest bells were added in 1959 and were cast by John Taylor Co. ...