Canopic Jar

Canopic Jar

Canopic jars were used by the Ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their owner for the afterlife. They were commonly either carved from limestone or were made of pottery. These jars were used by Ancient Egyptians from the time of the Old Kingdom up until the time of the Late Period or the Ptolemaic Period, by which time the viscera were simply wrapped and placed with the body. The viscera were not kept in a single canopic jar: each jar was reserved for specific organs. The name "canopic" reflects the mistaken association by early Egyptologists with the Greek legend of Canopus.

Canopic jars of the Old Kingdom were rarely inscribed, and had a plain lid. In the Middle Kingdom inscriptions became more usual, and the lids were often in the form of human heads. By the Nineteenth dynasty each of the four lids depicted one of the four sons of Horus, as guardians of the organs.

Read more about Canopic Jar:  Use and Design

Other articles related to "canopic jar, canopic jars, jar":

Canopic Jar - Use and Design
... The canopic jars were four in number, each for the safekeeping of particular human organs the stomach, intestines, lungs, and liver, all of which, it was believed, would be needed in the afterlife ... There was no jar for the heart the Egyptians believed it to be the seat of the soul, and so it was left inside the body ... The design of canopic jars changed over time ...

Famous quotes containing the word jar:

    Drink your fill when the jar is first opened, and when it is nearly done, but be sparing when it is half-empty; it’s a poor saving when you come to the dregs.
    Hesiod (c. 8th century B.C.)