Canon EF 200mm Lens - Crop Factor

Crop Factor

When used with a Canon APS-C (1.6x crop) DSLR camera or APS-H (1.3x crop), the field of view of this lens is similar to a 320mm or 260mm on full frame camera. There will be an apparent magnification of approximately 1.6x in the final image, since the "cropped" image will fill up the sensor. This is due to the crop factor inherent with APS-C or APS-H (crop) sensor digital SLR cameras.

An example would be taking an image of a rock using two cameras with the same lens. The first camera a 18mp full frame and the second a 18mp APS-C, both shooting the same composition in a stationary position. The first image will be more "wide" while the second image will be more "magnified". After bringing the results into an image editing program and enlarging the first image so that the rock is the same size in both images, one will see that the enlarged image is approximately 160% (1.6x) of the original.

The major advantage to this extra "reach" would be the utilizing of the full sensor space for a cropped image rather than having to crop afterwards, thus utilizing parts of the sensor that would have otherwise been wasted. The major disadvantage would be the lack of change in perspective, since the focal length has not actually changed it will be like shooting with the field of view of a 320mm lens on a full frame sensor while having the perspective of 200mm lens. The resulting image will appear to have a less pleasing background blur and unlike using an actual 320mm lens on a full frame sensor.

Read more about this topic:  Canon EF 200mm Lens

Other articles related to "crop factor, crop factors, crop":

Common Crop Factors
... Crop factor figures are useful in calculating 35 mm equivalent focal length and 35 mm equivalent magnification ... Some common crop factors are Type Height (mm) Crop factor 1/2.5" (Many Superzoom and point-and-shoot cameras) 4.29 5.6 1/2.3" (Compacts and Superzooms like Canon ...
Image Sensor Format - Sensor Size and Depth of Field
... It is equivalent to adjusting the f-number inversely in proportion to crop factor – a smaller f-number for smaller sensors ... is then operating at a lower ISO setting, by the square of the crop factor.) And, we might compare the depth of field of sensors receiving the same ... characteristic dimensions of the format, and thus is the relative crop factor between the sensors ...
Micro Four Thirds System - Advantages, Disadvantages and Other Factors - Disadvantages of Micro Four Thirds Compared With DSLRs
... The sensor is 35% smaller in area (2.0x crop factor) than APS-C (1.5x crop factor, or 1.6x for Canon-APS-C) sized sensors and 75% smaller (i.e ... a quarter of the area) than a full frame sensor (1.0x crop factor) (35 mm equivalent), which can mean lower image quality when all other variables are the same ... A larger crop factor (2x multiplier versus APS-C's 1.5x) means greater depth-of-field for the same equivalent field of view and f/stop when compared with APS-C and especially ...
Common Image Sensor Formats - Sensors Equipping Most DSLRs and Mirrorless Interchangeable-lens Cameras
... large sensors, either around the size of a frame of APS-C film, with a crop factor of 1.5-1.6 or 30% smaller than that, with a crop factor of 2.0 (this is the Four Thirds. 2011, Nikon announced their new format CX, whose size is 1" (2.7 crop factor) ... is the Pentax Q, equipped with a 1/2.3" sensor (5.62 crop factor) ...
Canon EF 200mm Lens - Crop Factor
... When used with a Canon APS-C (1.6x crop) DSLR camera or APS-H (1.3x crop), the field of view of this lens is similar to a 320mm or 260mm on full frame camera ... This is due to the crop factor inherent with APS-C or APS-H (crop) sensor digital SLR cameras ... a cropped image rather than having to crop afterwards, thus utilizing parts of the sensor that would have otherwise been wasted ...

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