CAN - Science and Medicine

Science and Medicine

  • CAN (gene), a human gene
  • Calcium ammonium nitrate, a fertilizer
  • Ceric ammonium nitrate, an inorganic compound
  • Chronic allograft nephropathy, the leading cause of kidney transplant failure

Read more about this topic:  CAN

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Vannevar Bush
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Famous quotes containing the words science and, medicine and/or science:

    The poet uses the results of science and philosophy, and generalizes their widest deductions.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    We have to ask ourselves whether medicine is to remain a humanitarian and respected profession or a new but depersonalized science in the service of prolonging life rather than diminishing human suffering.
    Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (b. 1926)

    The knowledge of an unlearned man is living and luxuriant like a forest, but covered with mosses and lichens and for the most part inaccessible and going to waste; the knowledge of the man of science is like timber collected in yards for public works, which still supports a green sprout here and there, but even this is liable to dry rot.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)