Caliber Machine

Some articles on machine, caliber, caliber machine:

M2 Browning - History
... The United States did not have many machine guns when it entered World War I, and most were old technology ... The machine gun was heavily used in World War I, and weapons of larger than rifle caliber were appearing ... Both the British and French had large caliber machine guns ...
.50 BMG
... The.50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG) or 12.7×99mm NATO is a cartridge developed for the Browning.50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s ... ball, tracer, armor piercing, incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds ... The rounds intended for machine guns are linked using metallic links ...
761st Tank Battalion (United States) - Prior To Combat
... and maintain the vehicle's 37 mm main gun and.30 caliber machine guns ... upgraded to the M4 Sherman medium tank, which had a 75 mm main gun, two.30 caliber machine guns, a.50 caliber machine gun, and a two-inch smoke mortar ...
Variants Of The M113 Armored Personnel Carrier - Australia
... mounting twin.30 Brownings(early service) or a.30/.50 Brownings machine guns for APC/LRV versions, a traverse bar to prevent the crew commander traversing the turret ... the Saladins and was armed with a 76mm gun, a.30 caliber coaxial machine gun and a.30 caliber machine gun mounted on the roof of the vehicle's turret ... turret as used on the V100/V150 series of armored cars, mounting two Browning machine guns, a.30 caliber and a M2.50 caliber machine gun ...
M75 Armored Personnel Carrier - Development
... crew, featured two remote controlled.50 caliber machine guns, which could be aimed remotely by either the commander or either of the two gunners ... prototype T18 dropped the assistant driver, but retained the remote controlled machine guns ... The T18E2 replaced the commander's cupola with a T122 machine gun mount, which could be fitted with either a.30 or.50 caliber machine gun ...

Famous quotes containing the word machine:

    The momentary charge at Balaklava, in obedience to a blundering command, proving what a perfect machine the soldier is, has, properly enough, been celebrated by a poet laureate; but the steady, and for the most part successful, charge of this man, for some years, against the legions of Slavery, in obedience to an infinitely higher command, is as much more memorable than that as an intelligent and conscientious man is superior to a machine. Do you think that that will go unsung?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)