Burston Strike School

The Burston Strike School was at the centre of the longest running strike in British history, between 1914 and 1939. Now a museum, it is in the village of Burston in Norfolk, England.

The strike began when teachers at the village's Church of England school, Annie Higdon and her husband, Tom Higdon, were sacked after a dispute with the area's school management committee and schoolchildren went on strike in their support. The Higdons set up an alternative school which was attended by 66 of their 72 former pupils. Beginning in a marquee on the village green, the school moved to local carpenter's premises and later to a purpose-built school financed by donations from the labour movement. Burston Strike School carried on teaching local children until shortly after Tom's death in 1939.

Read more about Burston Strike SchoolBackground To The Strike, The Strike School, Today

Other articles related to "burston strike school, strike school, school, strike":

Burston Strike School - Today
... In 1949 The Strike School was registered as an educational charity ... There are 4 self-perpetuating trustees who manage the school and try to develop it as a museum, visitor centre, educational archive and village amenity ... A rally to commemorate the school and the longest strike in UK history has been organised on the first Sunday in September every year since 1984 by the Transport and General Workers' Union and supported ...

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