Brough Superior - Brough Superior Motorcycles - Racing History (partial)

Racing History (partial)

Riders of Brough Superiors have won many races—TT, sprints (drag racing), hillclimbs, and top speed. Victories include:

  • 1922, George Brough, First Sidevalve Motorcycle to lap Brooklands at 100 mph (160 km/h).
  • 1927, 11 June: R. E. Thomas, 2½ Miles Sprint for Unlimited Capacity Solo Machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1927, 11 June: R. E. Thomas, 10 Miles for Unlimited Solo machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1927, 11 September: R. E. Thomas, 2½ Miles Sprint for Unlimited Capacity Solo Machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1927, 11 September: R. E. Thomas, 10 Miles Unlimited Race for Solo Machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1927, 11 September: R. E. Thomas, 25 Miles Race for Unlimited Solo Machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1927, 11 September: R. E. Thomas, 50 Miles Race for Unlimited Solo Machines, Cefn Sidan Speed Trials. 1st place.1
  • 1928: George Brough, one mile (1.6 km) sprint, Pendine. 1st place.1
  • 1928: R. E. Thomas, one mile (1.6 km) sprint, Pendine. 2nd place.1
  • 1931: J.H. Carr, 50 Miles Any Power Solo, Pendine. 1st place.1
  • 1931: J.H. Carr, 100 Miles Any Power Solo, Pendine. 1st place.1
  • 1935: Eric Fernihough, Brooklands motor-cycle lap record for all classes, 123.58 mph (198.88 km/h).2
  • 1936: Eric Fernihough, Solo world record for the mile. 163.82 mph (263.64 km/h).2
  • 1937: Eric Fernihough, Solo world record for the flying kilometre. 169.8 mph (273.3 km/h).2
  • 1937: Eric Fernihough, Side car world record for the flying kilometre. 137 mph (220 km/h).2

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