British Columbia Social Credit Party

The British Columbia Social Credit Party, whose members are known as Socreds, was the governing political party of British Columbia, Canada, for more than 30 years between the 1952 provincial election and the 1991 election. For four decades, the party dominated the British Columbian political scene, with the only break occurring between the 1972 and 1975 elections when the New Democratic Party of British Columbia was in power.

Although founded to promote social credit policies of monetary reform, the Social Credit Party became a political vehicle for fiscal conservatives and later social conservatives in BC, who discarded the social credit ideology.

After its defeat in 1991 the party essentially collapsed.

Read more about British Columbia Social Credit PartyParty Leaders, Other Prominent Socred Politicians, Electoral Results

Other articles related to "british columbia social credit party, british columbia social credit, social":

British Columbia Social Credit Party - Electoral Results
... In the 1937 election, the British Columbia Social Credit League endorsed candidates, but none were elected. 4,812 1.15% In the 1941 election, no candidates ran under the social credit banner ... In the 1945 election, an alliance of social credit groups nominated candidates ...

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