BR - Science

Science

  • Bromine (Br), chemical element with atomic number 35
  • 1,3-Butadiene, a type of rubber
  • Bacteriorhodopsin

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Other articles related to "science":

Vannevar Bush
... June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator known for his work on analog computers, for his role as an initiator and administrator of the Manhattan Project, for founding ... some six thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare ... during World War II, when he was in effect the first presidential science advisor ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
Vannevar Bush Award
... The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award (/væˈniːvər/ van-NEE-vər) in 1980 to honor Dr ... recognizes an individual who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of mankind and the Nation ... and the force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation ...
J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... scientists and academics to establish what would eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... did he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...

Famous quotes containing the word science:

    What would life be without art? Science prolongs life. To consist of what—eating, drinking, and sleeping? What is the good of living longer if it is only a matter of satisfying the requirements that sustain life? All this is nothing without the charm of art.
    Sarah Bernhardt (1845–1923)

    Hard times accounted in large part for the fact that the exposition was a financial disappointment in its first year, but Sally Rand and her fan dancers accomplished what applied science had failed to do, and the exposition closed in 1934 with a net profit, which was donated to participating cultural institutions, excluding Sally Rand.
    —For the State of Illinois, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Until politics are a branch of science we shall do well to regard political and social reforms as experiments rather than short-cuts to the millennium.
    —J.B.S. (John Burdon Sanderson)