Blockading Squadron

Some articles on squadron, blockading squadron:

Thomas H. Stevens, Jr. - American Civil War
... From then until the outbreak of the Civil War, Stevens served with the Home Squadron, principally in Roanoke, Colorado, and Michigan ... Late in April, he transferred to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and to the command of Maratanza ... he was directed to report to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron ...
CSS Raleigh (1864)
... to take his new ironclad over the bar at New Inlet, NC and attack the Union blockading squadron at sea ... Flares and cannon fire alerted the rest of the blockading squadron, but most commanders, unaware of the ironclad's presence, assumed a blockade runner had been cornered ... For the rest of the night, Raleigh steamed blindly through the blockading squadron, unnoticed ...
USS Fort Jackson (1862) - Service History
... In December 1863 Fort Jackson was assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron to cruise off the Western Bar, Cape Fear, and the following month helped in ... attached to the 2nd Division North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and on 21 October captured CSS Wando attempting to run through with a cargo of cotton ... On 1 February she was transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, underwent repair at Pensacola, Florida, and took up station on the Texas coast ...
USS San Jacinto (1850) - American Civil War, 1861-1865 - 1862
... for service as flagship of the Gulf Blockading Squadron ... on the 15th and remained in the area temporarily assigned to the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron to bolster Union naval forces in Hampton Roads lest Virginia ... relieved Flag Officer William McKean in command of the East Gulf Blockading Squadron and San Jacinto became the squadron flagship ...

Famous quotes containing the word squadron:

    Well gentlemen, this is it. This is what we’ve been waiting for. Tonight your target is Tokyo. And you’re gonna play ‘em the Star Spangled Banner with two-ton bombs. All you’ve got to do is to remember what you’ve learned and follow your squadron leaders. They’ll get you in, and they’ll get you out. Any questions? All right that’s all. Good luck to you. Give ‘em hell.
    Dudley Nichols (1895–1960)