Battle of Eutaw Springs

The Battle of Eutaw Springs was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, and was the last major engagement of the war in the Carolinas.

Read more about Battle Of Eutaw Springs:  Background, Organization, Battle, Casualties, Aftermath

Other articles related to "battle of eutaw springs, battle":

Otho Holland Williams - Southern Campaign - Battle of Eutaw Springs
... The Battle of Eutaw Springs can be divided into two distinct engagements ... During the first action, Greene had given the following order to Williams "Let Williams advance and sweep the field with his bayonets." The 6th Maryland Regiment advanced and broke the British line forcing them to fall back several miles and allowing the Continental Army to gain control of the British Camp ...
Battle Of Eutaw Springs - Aftermath
... The claim of several historians that the British won the battle is challenged by Christine Swager in her book The Valiant Died The Battle of Eutaw Springs September 8, 1781 ... The book argues that, first, at the end of the battle, the British held the majority, but not the entirety, of the field where the main battle took place ... not leave the vicinity for at least a full day following the battle ...

Famous quotes containing the words eutaw springs, springs, battle and/or eutaw:

    At Eutaw Springs the valiant died;
    Their limbs with dust are covered o’er—
    Weep on, ye springs, your tearful tide;
    How many heroes are no more!
    Philip Freneau (1752–1832)

    The Xanthus or Scamander is not a mere dry channel and bed of a mountain torrent, but fed by the ever-flowing springs of fame ... and I trust that I may be allowed to associate our muddy but much abused Concord River with the most famous in history.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    No battle is worth fighting except the last one.
    J. Enoch Powell (b. 1912)

    At Eutaw Springs the valiant died;
    Their limbs with dust are covered o’er—
    Weep on, ye springs, your tearful tide;
    How many heroes are no more!
    Philip Freneau (1752–1832)