Bankers

Some articles on bankers:

Country Bankers Act 1826
... The Country Bankers Act 1826 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom enacted during the reign of George IV ... The Country Bankers Act 1826 was one of the Bank Notes Acts 1826 to 1852 ...
Sheffield University Bankers Hockey Club - History
... Sheffield University Bankers Hockey Club came from a merger of the University of Sheffield Men/Women's hockey clubs' Saturday teams and the well-establishe ... The Sheffield Bankers club was formed in the 1920s and originally played at Abbeydale Park ...
Sterling Bank (Texas) - Sterling Bank in The Community
... In 2009, Sterling Bank received a Cornerstone Award from the Texas Bankers Foundation for “Saving Lives the Sterling Way,” an effort to increase the blood donations of bank employees ... In 2008, Sterling Bankers contributed over 10,000 hours of volunteer service to non-profits in Texas ... Fifty-three bankers invested 50 or more volunteer hours, earning the right to designate $500 grants for their favorite charities ...
Pittsburgh Bankers - History - Revived and Quick Demise
... The WPHL, along with the Pittsburgh Bankers was revived in for the 1907-08 season, once the IPHL folded ... On January 28, 1908, the Bankers might have been the first team to trade professional hockey players ... Pirates sent Jim MacKay, Edgar Dey and Dunc Taylor to the Bankers for Josephy Donnelly, Cliff Bennest and a player named "McGuire" ...

Famous quotes containing the word bankers:

    ...the shiny-cheeked merchant bankers from London with eighties striped blue ties and white collars and double-barreled names and double chins and double-breasted suits, who said “ears” when they meant “yes” and “hice” when they meant “house” and “school” when they meant “Eton”...
    John le Carré (b. 1931)

    There is too much sour grapes for my taste in the present American attitude. The time to denounce the bankers was when we were all feeding off their gold plate; not now! At present they have not only my sympathy but my preference. They are the last representatives of our native industries.
    Edith Wharton (1862–1937)