Artificial Induction of Immunity

Artificial induction of immunity is the artificial induction of immunity to specific diseases – making people immune to disease by means other than waiting for them to catch the disease. The purpose is to reduce the risk of death and suffering.

Immunity against infections that can cause serious illness is generally beneficial. Since Pasteur provided support for a germ theory of infectious disease, we have increasingly induced immunity against a widening range of diseases to prevent the associated risks from the wild infections. It is hoped that further understanding of the molecular basis of immunity will translate to improved clinical practice in the future.

Read more about Artificial Induction Of ImmunityVariolation and Smallpox, Vaccination, Germ Theory, Toxoids, Adjuvants, Temporarily-induced Immunity

Other articles related to "artificial induction of immunity, immunity":

Artificial Induction Of Immunity - Temporarily-induced Immunity
... See also immunoglobulin Temporary immunity to a specific infection can be induced in a subject by providing the subject with externally produced immune molecules, known as antibodies or immunoglobulins ... injecting this serum into the person for whom immunity is desired ... This is known as passive immunity, and the serum that is isolated from one subject and injected into another is sometimes called antiserum ...

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