Arranged Marriage in The Indian Subcontinent

Arranged Marriage In The Indian Subcontinent

Arranged marriages are traditional in South Asian society and continue to account for an overwhelming majority of marriages in the Indian subcontinent. Despite the fact that romantic love is "wholly celebrated" in both Indian mass media (such as Bollywood) and folklore, and the arranged marriage tradition lacks any official legal recognition or support, the institution has proved to be "surprisingly robust" in adapting to changed social circumstances and has defied predictions of decline as India modernized. Arranged marriages are believed to have initially risen to prominence in the Indian subcontinent when the historical Vedic religion gradually gave way to classical Hinduism (the ca. 500 BCE period), substantially displacing other alternatives that were once more prominent. In the urban culture of modern India, the differentiation between arranged and love marriages is increasingly seen as a "false dichotomy" with the emergence of phenomena such as "self-arranged marriages" and free-choice on the part of the prospective spouses.

Read more about Arranged Marriage In The Indian SubcontinentHistory, Developments in The Modern Period, The Arranged Marriage Process, Low Incidence of Divorce in India

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Arranged Marriage In The Indian Subcontinent - Low Incidence of Divorce in India
... In India, marriage is thought to be for life, and the divorce rate is extremely low ... Only 1.1% of marriages in India result in a divorce compared with over 45.8% in the United States, though the Indian figure appears to be rising ...

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