Army Knowledge Online - Access and Security

Access and Security

Registering for an AKO account is mandatory upon enlistment in the army. AKO access follows DoD security policy, and is accomplished by password or by a combination of a Common Access Card (CAC) and PIN. The requirements for an AKO password are stringent; a password must contain at least two uppercase letters, two lowercase letters, two numbers, and two special characters. Passwords expire every 150 days, and may not be replaced by any password used the previous ten times. As of July 2010, if accessed without a CAC, users are also required to answer three out of fifteen personal questions of their own choosing in order to further validate that the legitimate user is trying to access the site.

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Other articles related to "security, access":

Operation Flavius - Examination of MI5 Records
... Professor Christopher Andrew, the official historian for the Security Service, was given access to MI5's records to prepare a book for the centenary of the organisation ... Andrew had access to all files created by MI5 since it was founded but was limited in what he could publish ... He was required to enroll in the Security Service in order to be given access to the archives, which drew criticism from some historians and commentators prior to the writing of the book ...
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Famous quotes containing the words access and, security and/or access:

    Make thick my blood,
    Stop up th’ access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    ... most Southerners of my parents’ era were raised to feel that it wasn’t respectable to be rich. We felt that all patriotic Southerners had lost everything in defense of the South, and sufficient time hadn’t elapsed for respectable rebuilding of financial security in a war- impoverished region.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 1, ch. 1 (1962)

    The nature of women’s oppression is unique: women are oppressed as women, regardless of class or race; some women have access to significant wealth, but that wealth does not signify power; women are to be found everywhere, but own or control no appreciable territory; women live with those who oppress them, sleep with them, have their children—we are tangled, hopelessly it seems, in the gut of the machinery and way of life which is ruinous to us.
    Andrea Dworkin (b. 1946)