And Quiet Flows The Don - Literary Significance, Criticism, and Accusations of Plagiarism

Literary Significance, Criticism, and Accusations of Plagiarism

The novel has been compared to War and Peace (1869) by Leo Tolstoy. Like the Tolstoy novel, And Quiet Flows the Don is an epic picture of Russian life during a time of crisis and examines it through political, military, romantic, and civilian lenses. Sholokhov was accused by Solzhenitsyn and others, amongst them Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of Stalin and Natalia Belinkova of plagiarizing the novel. However, an investigation in the late 1920s upheld Sholokhov's authorship of "Silent Don" and the allegations were denounced as malicious slander in Pravda.

During the Second World War, Sholokhov's archive was destroyed in a bomb raid, and only the fourth volume survived. Sholokhov had his friend Vassily Kudashov, who was killed in the war, look after it. Following Kudashov's death, his widow took possession of the manuscript, but she never disclosed the fact of owning it. The manuscript was finally found by the Institute of World Literature of Russia's Academy of Sciences in 1999 with assistance from the Russian Government. The writing paper dates back to the 1920s: 605 pages are in Sholokhov's own hand, and 285 are transcribed by his wife Maria and sisters. However, there are claims that the manuscript is just a copy of the manuscript of Fyodor Kryukov, the true author.

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And Quiet Flows The Don - Literary Significance, Criticism, and Accusations of Plagiarism
... During the Second World War, Sholokhov's archive was destroyed in a bomb raid, and only the fourth volume survived ... Sholokhov had his friend Vassily Kudashov, who was killed in the war, look after it ...

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