Ancient Universities of Scotland - Universities (Scotland) Acts

Universities (Scotland) Acts

The Universities (Scotland) Acts created a distinctive system of governance for the ancient universities in Scotland, the process beginning with the 1858 Act and ending with the 1966 Act. Despite not being founded until after the first in these series of Acts, the University of Dundee shares all the features contained therein.

As a result of these Acts, each of these universities is governed by a tripartite system of General Council, University Court, and Academic Senate.

The chief executive and chief academic is the University Principal who also holds the title of Vice-Chancellor as an honorific. The Chancellor is a titular non-resident head to each university and is elected for life by the respective General Council, although in actuality a good number of Chancellors resign before the end of their "term of office".

Each also has a Students' Representative Council (SRC) as required by statute, although at the University of Aberdeen this has recently been renamed, the Students' Association Council (the Students' Association having been the parent body of the SRC).

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Ancient University - Universities - Universities (Scotland) Acts
... As mentioned above, the Universities(Scotland Actscreated a distinctive system of governance for the ancient universitiesin Scotland the process beginning with the 1858 ... until after the first in these series of Acts the University of Dundee shares all the features contained therein ... As a result of these Acts each of these universitiesis governed by a tripartite system of General Council, University Court, and Academic Senate ...

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