American Public Media - Historical Ties To Public Radio International

Historical Ties To Public Radio International

Formerly, much of American Public Media's programming content was distributed by Public Radio International, which itself was named "American Public Radio", or APR, until July 1, 1994. APR was formed by four stations, the Minnesota Public Radio network, WGBH in Boston, WNYC in New York, and KUSC in Los Angeles, to distribute A Prairie Home Companion. PRI owns and produces numerous programs today, but still also distributes diverse programming from many sources. In contrast, APM, which was founded in 2004, predominantly distributes content that it owns and produces itself; the current exceptions are The Story with Dick Gordon, and the BBC Proms broadcasts from Royal Albert Hall in London.

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