American Champion Older Female Horse

The Eclipse Award for Champion Older Female Horse is an American Thoroughbred horse racing honor. In 1936 both the Turf & Sports Digest magazine and Daily Racing Form (DRF) began naming an annual champion. Starting in 1950, the Thoroughbred Racing Associations (TRA) began naming its own champion. The following list provides the name of the horses chosen by both of these organizations. Whenever there were different champions named, the horses are listed side-by-side with the one chosen as champion by the Daily Racing Form noted with the letters (DRF), the one chosen by the Thoroughbred Racing Associations by the letters (TRA) and the one chosen by Turf and Sports Digest by the letters (TSD).

Prior to 1971 this award was referred to as "Champion Female Handicap Horse" or "Champion Handicap Mare". The Daily Racing Form version was open to any female horse, and was given to some Champions at the age of three, such as Tosmah, Twilight Tear and Busher.

The Daily Racing Form, the Thoroughbred Racing Associations, and the National Turf Writers Association all joined forces in 1971 to create the Eclipse Award.

Champions prior to 1936 were selected retrospectively by a panel of experts as published by The Blood-Horse magazine.

Other articles related to "american champion older female horse":

American Champion Older Female Horse - Honorees - Informal and Retrospective Awards
... Year Horse Age Trainer Owner 1935 Late Date 6 R ... E ...

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