Alvin Hansen

Alvin Hansen

Alvin Harvey Hansen (August 23, 1887 – June 6, 1975), often referred to as "the American Keynes," was a professor of economics at Harvard, a widely read author on current economic issues, and an influential advisor to the government who helped create the Council of Economic Advisors and the Social security system. He is best known for introducing Keynesian economics in the United States in the 1930s. More effectively than anyone else he explicated, extended, domesticated, and popularized the controversial ideas embodied in Keynes' The General Theory. In 1967, Paul McCracken, chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, saluted Hansen: "It is certainly a statement of fact that you have influenced the nation's thinking about economic policy more profoundly than any other economist in this century."

Read more about Alvin Hansen:  Early Years, Education, and Professional Career, Keynesianism, Stagnation, Public Policy

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Alvin Hansen - Public Policy
... Hansen excelled at both scholarly works and popular expositions that helped people understand economic cycles and deficit spending ... Hansen frequently testified before Congress ... During the Roosevelt and Truman presidencies Hansen was influential in shaping policy ...