Alexander Leslie, Earl of Ross - Early Life

Early Life

Alexander Leslie was the son of Euphemia I, Countess of Ross and her husband, the far-travelled Walter Leslie, Lord of Ross. His exact date of birth is not known. He was born somewhere between 1367, the year following his parents' marriage, and 1382, the year of his father's death. When his father died in 1382 he would have been no more than an adolescent or teenager.

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