Alcohol Consumption - Raw Materials of Alcoholic Beverages

Raw Materials of Alcoholic Beverages

The names of some alcoholic beverages are determined by their base material. In general, a beverage fermented from a grain mash will be called a beer. If the fermented mash is distilled, then the beverage is a spirit.

Wine and brandy are made only from grapes. If an alcoholic beverage is made from another kind of fruit, it is distinguished as fruit wine or fruit brandy. The kind of fruit must be specified, such as "cherry brandy" or "plum wine."

Beer is made from barley or a blend of several grains.

Whiskey (or whisky) is made from grain or a blend of several grains. The type of whiskey (scotch, rye, bourbon, or corn) is determined by the primary grain.

Vodka is distilled from fermented grain. It is highly distilled so that it will contain less of the flavor of its base material. Gin is a similar distillate but it is flavored by juniper berries and sometimes by other herbs as well.

In the United States and Canada, cider often means unfermented apple juice (sometimes called sweet cider), and fermented apple juice is called hard cider. In the United Kingdom and Australia, cider refers to the alcoholic beverage.

Applejack is sometimes made by means of freeze distillation.

Read more about this topic:  Alcohol Consumption

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