Alaska Airlines Arena At Hec Edmundson Pavilion

Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion, commonly known as Hec Ed, is an indoor arena on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, United States; the home of the Washington Huskies of the Pacific-12 Conference. Originally opened in 1927, the brick venue is home to the UW men's and women's basketball programs, as well as the women's volleyball and gymnastics teams. The current seating capacity of Hec Ed is 10,000 for basketball.

Read more about Alaska Airlines Arena At Hec Edmundson Pavilion:  Sponsors, Milestones

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Alaska Airlines Arena At Hec Edmundson Pavilion - Milestones
... Hec Ed has hosted the NCAA basketball Final Four twice, in 1949 and 1952 ... Hec Ed hosted the state tournament for over fifty years ... On May 21, 1974, the pioneering jam band Grateful Dead performed to a sold-out audience in the arena, playing the longest ever recorded version of "Playing in the Band" ...
Washington Huskies Men's Basketball - Alaska Airlines Arena At Hec Edmundson Pavilion
... See also Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion is the home for the Husky men's and women's basketball teams, volleyball team and gymnastics squad ... Originally completed in 1927, Hec Edmundson Pavilion underwent a $40 million, 19-month renovation between March 1999 and November 2000 to reconfigure its interior ... The pavilion's name was also changed originally slated to be "Seafirst Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion" when the deal was finalized in 1998, it became "Bank of America Arena at ...

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