Adirondack Park - History - Comparison of Selected Data From 1900 and 2000

Comparison of Selected Data From 1900 and 2000

Year:
1900 2000
Area of the Park 2,800,000 acres (1,100,000 ha) 6,000,000 acres (2,400,000 ha)
State-owned area 1,200,000 acres (490,000 ha) (43%) 2,400,000 acres (970,000 ha) (40%)
Travel time, New York City to Old Forge 6.5 hours by railroad 6 hours by car
Permanent park residents 100,000 130,000
Length of public road in the park 4,154 miles (6,685 km) plus 500 miles (800 km) of passenger railroad track 6,970 miles (11,220 km)
Industry 92 sawmills, 15 iron mines, 10 pulp/paper mills 40 sawmills

Data compiled by the Adirondack Museum, Blue Mountain Lake, New York

Read more about this topic:  Adirondack Park, History

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