Acoustic Resonance

Acoustic resonance is the tendency of an acoustic system to absorb more energy when it is forced or driven at a frequency that matches one of its own natural frequencies of vibration (its resonance frequency) than it does at other frequencies.

The term acoustic resonance is sometimes used to narrow mechanical resonance to the frequency range of human hearing, but since acoustics is defined in general terms concerning vibrational waves in matter acoustic resonance can occur at frequencies outside the range of human hearing.

An acoustically resonant object usually has more than one resonance frequency, especially at harmonics of the strongest resonance. It will easily vibrate at those frequencies, and vibrate less strongly at other frequencies. It will "pick out" its resonance frequency from a complex excitation, such as an impulse or a wideband noise excitation. In effect, it is filtering out all frequencies other than its resonance.

Acoustic resonance is an important consideration for instrument builders, as most acoustic instruments use resonators, such as the strings and body of a violin, the length of tube in a flute, and the shape of a drum membrane. Acoustic resonance is also important for hearing. For example, resonance of a stiff structural element, called the basilar membrane within the cochlea of the inner ear allows hair cells on the membrane to detect sound. (For mammals the membrane by having different resonance on either end so that high frequencies are concentrated on one end and low frequencies on the other.)

Like mechanical resonance, acoustic resonance can result in catastrophic failure of the vibrator. The classic example of this is breaking a wine glass with sound at the precise resonant frequency of the glass; although this is difficult in practice.

Read more about Acoustic Resonance:  Resonance of A String, Resonance of A Tube of Air, Resonance of A Sphere of Air (Vented), False Tones, Resonance in Musical Composition

Other articles related to "acoustic resonance, resonance, acoustic, acoustics, resonances":

Passive Analogue Filter Development - Resonance - Acoustic Resonance
... As mentioned earlier, it was acoustic resonance that inspired filtering applications, the first of these being a telegraph system known as the "harmonic telegraph" ...
Types of Resonance - Mechanical and Acoustic Resonance
... Mechanical resonance is the tendency of a mechanical system to absorb more energy when the frequency of its oscillations matches the system's natural frequency of vibration ... When designing objects, Engineers must ensure the mechanical resonance frequencies of the component parts do not match driving vibrational frequencies of motors or other oscillating parts, a ... Avoiding resonance disasters is a major concern in every building, tower and bridge construction project ...
Closed Tube
... Acoustic resonance is the tendency of an acoustic system to absorb more energy when it is forced or driven at a frequency that matches one of its own natural ... The term acoustic resonance is sometimes used to narrow mechanical resonance to the frequency range of human hearing, but since acoustics is defined in ... An acoustically resonant object usually has more than one resonance frequency, especially at harmonics of the strongest resonance ...
Acoustic Resonance - Resonance in Musical Composition
... Several composers have begun to make resonance the subject of compositions ... Alvin Lucier has used acoustic instruments and sine wave generators to explore the resonance of objects large and small in many of his compositions ... or other percussion instrument interact with room resonances in James Tenney's Koan Having Never Written A Note For Percussion ...

Famous quotes containing the word resonance:

    It is closing time in the gardens of the West and from now on an artist will be judged only by the resonance of his solitude or the quality of his despair.
    Cyril Connolly (1903–1974)