1920 Duluth Lynchings - Popular Culture

Popular Culture

The first verse of Bob Dylan's 1965 song "Desolation Row" recalls the lynchings in Duluth. Dylan was born in Duluth, and grew up in Hibbing, which is 30 miles north of Duluth. His father, Abram Zimmerman, was nine years old in June 1920 and lived two blocks from the site of the lynchings. Zimmerman passed the story on to his son.

Read more about this topic:  1920 Duluth Lynchings

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