110 Film

110 Film

110 is a cartridge-based film format used in still photography. It was introduced by Kodak in 1972. 110 is essentially a miniaturised version of Kodak's earlier 126 film format. Each frame is 13 mm × 17 mm (0.51 in × 0.67 in), with one registration hole.

The film is fully housed in a plastic cartridge, which also registers the image when the film is advanced. There is a continuous backing paper, and the frame number and film type are visible through a window at the rear of the cartridge. The film does not need to be rewound and is very simple to load and unload. It is pre-exposed with frame lines and numbers, a feature intended to make it easier and more efficient for photofinishers to print.

Unlike later competing formats, such as disc and APS film, processed 110 negatives were returned in strips, without the original cartridge.

Read more about 110 Film:  History, Design and Technical Issues, Film Types

Other articles related to "110 film, film, 110":

110 Film - Film Types
... Although the format is commonly associated with print film, Kodak also produced Kodachrome 110 slide film until 1982 ... with standard sized slides that fit into standard projectors, 110 slide film could also be processed into smaller format slides ... The dedicated 110 projector overcame this by using a brighter lamp ...

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