Zone Diet - Theory - Hormonal Paradoxes

Hormonal Paradoxes

Sears believes in a hormonal paradox contrary to the "low-fat/high carbohydrate" rationale of most diets (including the USDA "Food Pyramid"). He claims that the relatively high proportion of carbohydrate in these diets—by comparison to protein— increases the production of the hormone insulin, causing the body to store more fat. The example proposed by Sears is the cattle ranching practice of fattening livestock efficiently by feeding them high amounts of high-carbohydrate grain. Sears points out the supposed irony:

"data analysis ... shows that in spite of the fact that the American public has dramatically cut back on the amount of fat consumed, the country has experienced an epidemic rise in obesity."

Additionally, Sears suggests fat consumption is essential for "burning" fat. His rationale is: Monounsaturated fats in a meal contribute to a feeling of fullness and decrease the rate at which carbohydrates are absorbed into the bloodstream. Slower carbohydrate absorption means lower insulin levels which means less stored fat and a faster transition to fat burning. If the body needs energy and can't burn fat because of high insulin levels, a person feels tired as their brain starves and metabolism slows to compensate. This occurs because the brain runs on glucose and high insulin levels deplete blood glucose levels. Such a condition, rebound hypoglycemia, causes sweet cravings (which just starts the high-insulin cycle all over again).

Sears describes a Zone meal as follows: "Eat as much protein as the palm of your hand, as much non-starchy raw vegetables as you can stand for the vitamins, enough carbohydrates to maintain mental clarity because the brain runs on glucose, and enough monounsaturated oils to keep feelings of hunger away."

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