Youth Service America

Youth Service America, or YSA, is a resource center that partners with thousands of organizations committed to increasing the quality and quantity of volunteer opportunities for young people, ages 5-25, to serve locally, nationally, and globally." YSA has a reputation for supporting and promoting youth voice, youth service, and service-learning through advocacy, resource sharing, and handing out over $1 million in grants. Steve Culbertson is the President & CEO.

Read more about Youth Service America:  History, Programs

Other articles related to "youth service america, youth service":

Youth Service America - Programs
... support of the State Farm Companies Foundation and PARADE Magazine, Youth Service America organizes Global Youth Service Day, a public education campaign to ... As the largest youth service event in the world and YSA's premier program, it draws together a remarkable consortium of local, regional, national, and international partners ... YSA developed the Global Youth Service Day program in 2000 which now takes place in more than 100 countries ...

Famous quotes containing the words america, youth and/or service:

    Only in America ... do these peasants, our mothers, get their hair dyed platinum at the age of sixty, and walk up and down Collins Avenue in Florida in pedalpushers and mink stoles—and with opinions on every subject under the sun. It isn’t their fault they were given a gift like speech—look, if cows could talk, they would say things just as idiotic.
    Philip Roth (b. 1933)

    I always was of opinion that the placing a youth to study with an attorney was rather a prejudice than a help.... The only help a youth wants is to be directed what books to read, and in what order to read them.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    In the early forties and fifties almost everybody “had about enough to live on,” and young ladies dressed well on a hundred dollars a year. The daughters of the richest man in Boston were dressed with scrupulous plainness, and the wife and mother owned one brocade, which did service for several years. Display was considered vulgar. Now, alas! only Queen Victoria dares to go shabby.
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826–1903)