Xfce

Xfce (pronounced as four individual letters) is a free software desktop environment for Unix and Unix-like platforms, such as Linux, Solaris, and BSD. It aims to be fast and lightweight, while still being visually appealing and easy to use. It consists of separately packaged components that together provide the full functionality of the desktop environment, but which can be selected in subsets to create the user's preferred personal working environment. Xfce is mainly used for its ability to run a modern desktop environment on relatively modest hardware.

Xfce is included as one of the graphical user interfaces on the Pandora handheld gaming system.

Read more about XfceFeatures, History, Applications

Other articles related to "xfce":

Sabayon Linux - Releases
2010 CoreCD with X and Fluxbox 5.3 LXDE/XFCE 19 July 2010 First stable version featuring LXDE/XFCE 5.3 SpinBase/OpenVZ Templates 19 July 2010 First stable version featuring ready to use ...
OLPC XO-1 - Design - Software - Desktop Environments
... Xfce is a lightweight alternative GUI to Sugar ... According to the OLPC Wiki "Xfce is a lightweight but powerful desktop environment that will work well on the XO" Information on installation is available at OLPC Wiki Xfce.The ...
Thunar
... written using the GTK+ 2 toolkit, and shipped with Xfce version 4.4 RC1 and later ... developed by Benedikt Meurer, and was originally intended to replace XFFM, Xfce's previous file manager ... Like the rest of Xfce, Thunar is designed to comply with standards, such as those stated at freedesktop.org ...
Terminal (Xfce)
... Terminal is a terminal emulator built for the Xfce desktop environment using GTK+ ... It is provided as part of the Xfce project, but it can be used in other X Window System environments as well ...
Xubuntu
... maintained derivative of the Ubuntu operating system, using the Xfce desktop environment ... The name Xubuntu is a portmanteau of Xfce and Ubuntu ... Xfce originally was an abbreviation for XForms Common Environment, while Ubuntu means "humanity towards others" in the Zulu and Xhosa languages ...