Xenophon

Xenophon (Greek: Ξενοφῶν, Xenophōn; c. 430 – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldier, mercenary, philosopher and a contemporary and admirer of Socrates. He is known for his writings on the history of his own times, the 4th century BC, preserving the sayings of Socrates, and descriptions of life in ancient Greece and the Persian Empire.

Read more about XenophonList of Works

Other articles related to "xenophon":

Crito Of Alopece - In Literature
... Xenophon portrays him in his Memorabilia and Symposium ... Though Xenophon counts Crito in the small circle of genuine associates of Socrates, neither Xenophon nor Plato portrays Crito as very philosophically inclined ... the Euthydemus, Crito frequently expresses disinterest in the work of philosophers, although Xenophon depicts Crito as urging his sons to follow ...
Xenophon - List of Works - Short Treatises
... on the Constitution of Athens exists that was once thought to be by Xenophon, but which was probably written when Xenophon was about five years old ... in manuscripts among the short works of Xenophon, as though he had written it also ...
Cynegeticus - Chapter 12
... Xenophon ends the discussion on the practical side of hunting and explains the benefits of hunting ... Xenophon writes, “For men who are sound in body and mind may always stand on the threshold of success” (XII.5) ... Xenophon goes on to defend hunting from those who think it causes them to avoid domestic affairs, however he believes that they will instead protect and assist their fellow citizens ...
Satrapy Of Armenia - Armen Economics and Commerce
... away his silver-footed bedstead and his cups, as well as his bakers and cup-bearers (Xenophon) ... beer from a great jar, sucking it through a tube." The horses of Armenia, says Xenophon, were smaller than those of Persia, but livelier ... Being told that horses were sacrificed to the sun, Xenophon gave his old horse, in exchange for a foal, to a village chief, to be sacrificed, after being ...
Phasians
... The Greek commander Xenophon, who encountered them during his march through Asia Minor to the Black Sea (401-400 BC), places them on the river Phasis ... Here, the Phasis of Xenophon is not the common Graeco-Roman designation for the modern day Rioni River in Georgia, but rather the sources of Araxes in what ... At the time when Xenophon met them, the Phasians were in control of the long valley to the north of Cilligül Dağ, and lived in the neighborhood of the Chalybes and Taochi, presumably ...