WTA Madrid Open (tennis) - Champions - Doubles

Doubles

Year Champions Runners-up Score
↓ Tier II tournament ↓
1996 Jana Novotná
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Sabine Appelmans
Miriam Oremans
7–6, 6–2
↓ Tier III tournament ↓
1997 Mary Joe Fernandez
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
Inés Gorrochategui
Irina Spîrlea
6–3, 6–2
1998 Florencia Labat
Dominique Monami
Rachel McQuillan
Nicole Pratt
6–3, 6–1
1999 Virginia Ruano Pascual
Paola Suárez
María-Fernanda Landa
Marlene Weingärtner
6–2, 0–6, 6–0
2000 Lisa Raymond
Rennae Stubbs
Gala León García
María Sánchez Lorenzo
6–1, 6–3
2001 Virginia Ruano Pascual
Paola Suárez
Lisa Raymond
Rennae Stubbs
7–5, 2–6, 7–6
2002 Martina Navratilova
Natasha Zvereva
Rossana de los Ríos
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
6–2, 6–3
2003 Jill Craybas
Liezel Huber
Rita Grande
Angelique Widjaja
6–4, 7–6

Read more about this topic:  WTA Madrid Open (tennis), Champions

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    For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another’s happiness.
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