Wrist Watch Power Time Keeping and Types of Watch Batteries

Famous quotes containing the words types, batteries, keeping, wrist, watch, power and/or time:

    If there is nothing new on the earth, still the traveler always has a resource in the skies. They are constantly turning a new page to view. The wind sets the types on this blue ground, and the inquiring may always read a new truth there.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Postmodernism is, almost by definition, a transitional cusp of social, cultural, economic and ideological history when modernism’s high-minded principles and preoccupations have ceased to function, but before they have been replaced with a totally new system of values. It represents a moment of suspension before the batteries are recharged for the new millennium, an acknowledgment that preceding the future is a strange and hybrid interregnum that might be called the last gasp of the past.
    Gilbert Adair, British author, critic. Sunday Times: Books (London, April 21, 1991)

    I have been searching history to see if really a woman has any precedent to claim the right to have her rights, and I am compelled to say that we men are not so much ahead of women after all, and the only way we have kept our reputation up is by keeping her down—and don’t you forget it!
    George E. Foster, U.S. women’s magazine contributor. The Woman’s Magazine, pp. 38-41 (October 1886)

    you show her the two hands
    that grip each other fiercely,
    one being mine, one being yours.
    Torn right off at the wrist bone
    when you started in your
    impossible going, gone.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Half the testimony in the Bobbitt case sounded like Sally Jesse Raphael. Juries watch programs like this and are ready to listen.
    William Geimer, U.S. law educator. New York Times, p. B18 (January 28, 1994)

    There is a power in love to divine another’s destiny better than that other can, and, by heroic engagements, hold him to his task.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Frequently also some fair-weather finery ripped off a vessel by a storm near the coast was nailed up against an outhouse. I saw fastened to a shed near the lighthouse a long new sign with the words “ANGLO SAXON” on it in large gilt letters, as if it were a useless part which the ship could afford to lose, or which the sailors had discharged at the same time with the pilot. But it interested somewhat as if it had been a part of the Argo, clipped off in passing through the Symplegades.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)