Woollcott

Some articles on woollcott:

The Man Who Came To Dinner - Influence of Alexander Woollcott
... Kaufman and Hart wrote the play as a vehicle for their friend Alexander Woollcott, the model for the lead character Sheridan Whiteside ... At the time the play was written Woollcott was famous both as the theater critic who helped re-launch the career of the Marx Brothers and as the star of the national radio ... Kaufman and Hart had promised a vehicle for Woollcott but had been unable to find a plot that suited them until one day Woollcott showed up, unannounced, at Hart's Bucks County estate, and proceeded to take over the ...
Alexander Woollcott
... Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 – January 23, 1943) was an American critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine and a member of the Algonquin Round Table ... Nero Wolfe, but Stout, although he was friendly to Woollcott, said there was nothing to that idea ...
Alexander Woollcott - Films
... W's Little Game (1934) Woollcott's only short subject, set in a nightclub ... Gift of Gab (1934) Alexander Woollcott, cameo in Universal Pictures feature The Scoundrel (1935) This Oscar-winning film was made by Woollcott's friends Ben Hecht and Charles ... Woollcott appears in a supporting role ...
Algonquin Round Table - Origin
... Toohey, annoyed at New York Times drama critic Alexander Woollcott for refusing to plug one of Toohey's clients in his column, organized a luncheon supposedly to welcome Woollcott back from World War I, where he ... Instead Toohey used the occasion to poke fun at Woollcott on a number of fronts ... Woollcott's enjoyment of the joke and the success of the event prompted Toohey to suggest that the group in attendance meet at the Algonquin each day for lunch ...
Edna Ferber - Biography - Career
... Ferber and another member of the Round Table, Alexander Woollcott, were long-time enemies, their antipathy lasting until Woollcott's death in 1943 ... According to Teichmann, Ferber once described Woollcott as "a New Jersey Nero who has mistaken his pinafore for a toga." ...

Famous quotes containing the word woollcott:

    All the things I really like to do are either immoral, illegal, or fattening.
    —Alexander Woollcott (1887–1943)