Woodbine, New Jersey - Education

Education

The Woodbine School District serves students in public school for kindergarten through eighth grade. Woodbine Elementary School had an enrollment of 207 students in the 2010-11 school year.

Public school students in grades 9-12 attend high school in Millville, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Millville Public Schools. Students attend Memorial High School for grades 9 and half of the 10th grade and Millville Senior High School for half of the 10th grade through the 12th grade.

Read more about this topic:  Woodbine, New Jersey

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Famous quotes containing the word education:

    It is not every man who can be a Christian, even in a very moderate sense, whatever education you give him. It is a matter of constitution and temperament, after all. He may have to be born again many times. I have known many a man who pretended to be a Christian, in whom it was ridiculous, for he had no genius for it. It is not every man who can be a free man, even.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    ... education fails in so far as it does not stir in students a sharp awareness of their obligations to society and furnish at least a few guideposts pointing toward the implementation of these obligations.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877–?)

    Perhaps the most valuable result of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it ought to be done, whether you like it or not; it is the first lesson that ought to be learned; and however early a man’s training begins, its probably the last lesson that he learns thoroughly.
    Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)