Women's Professional Football League

The Women's Professional Football League (WPFL) was the original and longest operating women's professional American football league in the United States. With teams across the United States, the WPFL had its first game in 1999 with just two original teams: the Lake Michigan Minx and the Minnesota Vixens. Fifteen teams nationwide competed for the championship in 2006.

The league had been recognized in national media campaigns, in the book Atta Girl, and even had a team (the New England Storm) that had a commercial relationship with an NFL team, the 2002 Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots.

Unlike the other women's American football franchises, the WPFL operated as a fall league and not a spring league.

Read more about Women's Professional Football LeagueHistory, Effects, Championships

Famous quotes containing the words league, football, professional and/or women:

    Half a league, half a league,
    Half a league onward,
    All in the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.
    “Forward the Light Brigade!
    Alfred Tennyson (1809–1892)

    People stress the violence. That’s the smallest part of it. Football is brutal only from a distance. In the middle of it there’s a calm, a tranquility. The players accept pain. There’s a sense of order even at the end of a running play with bodies stewn everywhere. When the systems interlock, there’s a satisfaction to the game that can’t be duplicated. There’s a harmony.
    Don Delillo (b. 1926)

    The relationship between mother and professional has not been a partnership in which both work together on behalf of the child, in which the expert helps the mother achieve her own goals for her child. Instead, professionals often behave as if they alone are advocates for the child; as if they are the guardians of the child’s needs; as if the mother left to her own devices will surely damage the child and only the professional can rescue him.
    Elaine Heffner (20th century)

    Behind all their personal vanity, women themselves always have an impersonal contempt—for “woman.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)