Windows Vista Editions

Windows Vista Editions

Windows Vista, a major release of the Microsoft Windows operating system, was available in six different editions (Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, Enterprise and Ultimate). With the exception of Windows Vista Starter, all editions support both 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x64) processor architectures. Microsoft ceased retail copies of Windows Vista in October 2010.

On September 5, 2006 Microsoft announced the USD pricing for the four editions available through retail-channels. It has made available new license and upgrade-license SKUs for each edition.

Microsoft characterizes the packaging for the retail-editions of Windows Vista as "designed to be user-friendly, a hard plastic container that will protect the software inside for life-long use". The case opens sideways to reveal the Windows Vista DVD suspended in a clear plastic case. The Windows Vista disc itself uses a holographic design similar to the discs that Microsoft has produced since Windows 98.


Read more about Windows Vista Editions:  Editions For Personal Computers, Vista For Embedded Systems, Comparison Chart, Upgrading, See Also

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Windows Vista Editions - See Also
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