Will Durant - Selected Books

Selected Books

See a full bibliography at Will Durant Online .

  • Durant, Will (1917) Philosophy and the Social Problem. New York: Macmillan.
  • Durant, Will (1926) The Story of Philosophy. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (1927) Transition. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (1929) The Mansions of Philosophy. New York: Simon and Schuster. Later with slight revisions re-published as The Pleasures of Philosophy
  • Durant, Will (1930) The Case for India. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (1931) Adventures in Genius. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (1931) Great Men of Literature, taken from Adventures in Genius. New York: Garden City Publishing Co.
  • Durant, Will (1953) The Pleasures of Philosophy. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will & Durant, Ariel (1968) The Lessons of History. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will & Durant, Ariel (1970) Interpretations of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will & Durant, Ariel (1977) A Dual Autobiography. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (2001) Heroes of History: A Brief History of Civilization from Ancient Times to the Dawn of the Modern Age. New York: Simon and Schuster. Actually copyrighted by John Little and the Estate of Will Durant.
  • Durant, Will (2002) The Greatest Minds and Ideas of All Time. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  • Durant, Will (2003) An Invitation to Philosophy: Essays and Talks on the Love of Wisdom. Promethean Press.
  • Durant, Will (2008) Adventures in Philosophy. Promethean Press.

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Karlheinz Stockhausen - Sources
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