Wide Area Information Server

Wide Area Information Server

Wide Area Information Servers or WAIS is a client–server text searching system that uses the ANSI Standard Z39.50 Information Retrieval Service Definition and Protocol Specifications for Library Applications" (Z39.50:1988) to search index databases on remote computers. It was developed in the late 1980s as a project of Thinking Machines, Apple Computer, Dow Jones, and KPMG Peat Marwick.

WAIS did not adhere to either the standard or its OSI framework (adopting instead TCP/IP) but created a unique protocol inspired by Z39.50:1988.

Read more about Wide Area Information Server:  History, Directory of Servers, People, WAIS and Gopher

Other articles related to "wide area information server, servers, wide, server":

Wide Area Information Server - WAIS and Gopher
... used as a full text search engine for individual Internet Gopher servers, supplementing the popular Veronica system which only searches the menu titles of Gopher sites ... WAIS and Gopher share the World Wide Web's client–server architecture and a certain amount of its functionality ... In both cases, simple file servers generate the menus or hypertext directly from the file structure of a server ...

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