Who Killed The Electric Car?

Who Killed the Electric Car? is a 2006 documentary film that explores the creation, limited commercialization, and subsequent destruction of the battery electric vehicle in the United States, specifically the General Motors EV1 of the mid 1990s. The film explores the roles of automobile manufacturers, the oil industry, the US government, the California government, batteries, hydrogen vehicles, and consumers in limiting the development and adoption of this technology.

After a premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, it was released theatrically by Sony Pictures Classics in June, 2006 and then on DVD by Sony Pictures Home Entertainment on November 14, 2006.

During an interview with CBS News, director Chris Paine announced that he had started a new documentary about electric cars with a working title of Who Saved the Electric Car?, later renamed Revenge of the Electric Car, which had its world premiere at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival on Earth Day, April 22, 2011.

Read more about Who Killed The Electric Car?:  Topics Addressed, Interviews, Production, The Suspects, Response From General Motors, Reception, See Also

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Who Killed The Electric Car? - See Also
... Battery electric vehicle Compressed air car Electric vehicle Future car technologies General Motors EV1 Great American streetcar scandal Hybrid vehicle Hydrogen vehicle ...

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