Who is William Jennings Bryan?

William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a leading American politician from the 1890s until his death. He was a dominant force in the liberal wing of the Democratic Party, standing three times as its candidate for President of the United States (1896, 1900 and 1908). He served in Congress briefly as a Representative from Nebraska and was the 41st United States Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson (1913–1915), taking a pacifist position on the World War. Bryan was a devout Christian, a supporter of popular democracy, and an enemy of the gold standard as well as banks and railroads. He was a leader of the silverite movement in the 1890s, a peace advocate, a prohibitionist, and an opponent of Darwinism on religious and humanitarian grounds. With his deep, commanding voice and wide travels, he was one of the best known orators and lecturers of the era. Because of his faith in the wisdom of the common people, he was called "The Great Commoner."

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William Jennings Bryan - Legacy - Honors
... This section needs additional citations for verification Bryan County, Oklahoma is named after him ... Bryan Memorial Hospital (now BryanLGH Medical Center) of Lincoln, Nebraska, and Bryan College located in Dayton, Tennessee, are also named for William Jennings Bryan ... The William Jennings Bryan House in Nebraska was named a U.S ...

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    I am the first to admit that I am no great orator or no person that got where I have gotten by any William Jennings Bryan technique.
    Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913)

    I think we will live through his term, Archie, and I’ll tell you something, old man, if they don’t stop hammering me, first Bryan for not enforcing the Anti-Trust Law and Wall Street for enforcing it, they may succeed in electing me to another term whether I want it or not.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    With wonderful deathless ditties
    We build up the world’s great cities,
    —Arthur William Edgar O’Shaughnessy (1844–1881)

    The humblest citizen of all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error.
    —William Jennings Bryan (1860–1925)