Who is Ruskin?

  • (noun): British art critic (1819-1900).
    Synonyms: John Ruskin

Ruskin

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Some articles on Ruskin:

Lilias Trotter - Art
... Quoting a letter from famous art critic John Ruskin “ When I was at Venice in 1876—it is about the only thing that makes me now content in having gone there—two English ladies, mother and daughter ... was shown it, and ever so much more than she was taught ” Ruskin did not believe that ladies could paint before he met Trotter ... Ruskin believed that if she would devote herself to art "she would be the greatest living painter and do things that would be immortal." He was unhappy that she was spending so much time on the streets of London ...
Scott Ruskin (cricketer)
... Scott Ruskin (born 12 January 1975) is an English cricketer ... Ruskin, who made his debut for the team in the 2000 Minor counties Championship, played in two C G Trophy matches, during the 2001 season ... As of 2008, Ruskin still plays for Hertford Cricket Club in the Evening Standard Challenge Trophy ...
Sydney Cockerell - Life
... Cockerell Co, until he met John Ruskin ... According to John Ruskin by Tim Hilton (p. 816), around 1887 Cockerell sent Ruskin some sea shells, which he collected ...
Derrick Leon
... in November 1944, aged 36, shortly after completing the first draft of his biography of John Ruskin (Ruskin The Great Victorian), published by Routledge Kegan Paul in 1949 ... His biography of Ruskin cast new light on John Ruskin's personal tragedies, as well as his public life and his work ... After Leon's death, his biography of Ruskin was subjected to a quotation check and grammatical corrections by George Leon, his brother, who was a quantity-surveyor by profession ...
Ruskin, Minnesota
... Ruskin is an unincorporated community in Rice County, Minnesota, United States ... A school, the Ruskin School, is located near the center of the community ...

Famous quotes containing the word ruskin:

    Along the iron veins that traverse the frame of our country, beat and flow the fiery pulses of its exertion, hotter and faster every hour. All vitality is concentrated through those throbbing arteries into the central cities; the country is passed over like a green sea by narrow bridges, and we are thrown back in continually closer crowds on the city gates.
    —John Ruskin (1819–1900)

    Architecture ... the adaptation of form to resist force.
    —John Ruskin (1819–1900)

    What do we, as a nation, care about books? How much do you think we spend altogether on our libraries, public or private, as compared with what we spend on our horses?
    —John Ruskin (1819–1900)