Who is mary church terrell?

Mary Church Terrell

Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954), daughter of former slaves, was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree. She became an activist who led several important associations, including the National Associate of Colored Women, and worked for civil rights and suffrage.

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Some articles on mary church terrell:

Mary Church Terrell - Works
... Church Review (January 1900), 340-354 "Club Work of Colored Women", Southern Workman, August 8, 1901, 435-438 "Society Among the COlored People of Washington", Voice of the Negro (April ...
Mary Church Terrell House
... Mary Church Terrell House was a home of civil rights leader Mary Church Terrell in Washington, D.C. ... Terrell was the first black woman to serve on an American school board, in 1896 ...

Famous quotes containing the words terrell, mary and/or church:

    I cannot help wondering sometimes what I might have become and might have done if I had lived in a country which had not circumscribed and handicapped me on account of my race, but had allowed me to reach any height I was able to attain.
    —Mary Church Terrell (1863–1954)

    Always clung to by barnacles.
    Hawaiian saying no. 2661, ‘lelo No’Eau, collected, translated, and annotated by Mary Kawena Pukui, Bishop Museum Press, Hawaii (1983)

    Baseball is the religion that worships the obvious and gives thanks that things are exactly as they seem. Instead of celebrating mysteries, baseball rejoices in the absence of mysteries and trusts that, if we watch what is laid before our eyes, down to the last detail, we will cultivate the gift of seeing things as they really are.
    Thomas Boswell, U.S. sports journalist. “The Church of Baseball,” Baseball: An Illustrated History, ed. Geoffrey C. Ward, Knopf (1994)