Who is Epicurus?

  • (noun): Greek philosopher who believed that the world is a random combination of atoms and that pleasure is the highest good (341-270 BC).

Epicurus

Epicurus (Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, Epikouros, "ally, comrade"; 341 BCE – 270 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher as well as the founder of the school of philosophy called Epicureanism. Only a few fragments and letters of Epicurus's 300 written works remain. Much of what is known about Epicurean philosophy derives from later followers and commentators.

Read more about Epicurus.

Some articles on Epicurus:

Apollodorus The Epicurean
... of tyranny or supremacy in the garden or school of Epicurus ... One was called a Life of Epicurus ... Collection of Doctrines, in which he asserted that Epicurus had written a greater amount of original writing than the Stoic Chrysippus, because although Chrysippus had ...
Epicurus and The Epicursim
... term Epikoros is used, without a specific reference to the Greek philosopher Epicurus, yet it seems apparent that the term was derived from his name ... Epicurus's technically hedonistic views and philosophical teachings, though opposed to the Hedonists of his time, countered Jewish scripture, the ...
List Of Landor's Imaginary Conversations - First Series: Classical Dialogues - Greek
... the Priest of Hammon Aristoteles and Callisthenes Epicurus, Leontion, and Ternissa Epicurus and Metrodorus Menander and Epicurus (two) Lucian and Timotheus ...
Leonteus Of Lampsacus
... He was the husband of Themista, who also attended Epicurus' school ... Such was the esteem in which they held Epicurus that they named their son after him ... Leonteus, in which Leonteus describes how Democritus was honoured by Epicurus "for having anticipated him in getting hold of correct knowledge," and how Epicurus originally ...
Epikouros - Epicurus and The Epicursim
... without a specific reference to the Greek philosopher Epicurus, yet it seems apparent that the term was derived from his name ... Epicurus's technically hedonistic views and philosophical teachings, though opposed to the Hedonists of his time, countered Jewish scripture, the strictly monotheistic conception of God in ...