Who is claude mckay?

Claude McKay

Claude McKay (born Festus Claudius McKay) (September 15, 1889 – May 22, 1948) was a Jamaican-American writer and poet. He was a seminal figure in the Harlem Renaissance and wrote four novels: Home to Harlem (1928), a best-seller which won the Harmon Gold Award for Literature, Banjo (1929), Banana Bottom (1933) and in 1941 the manuscript of a novel that has not yet been published called Amiable With Big Teeth: A Novel of the Love Affair Between the Communists and the Poor Black Sheep of Harlem. McKay also authored a collection of short stories, Gingertown (1932), and two autobiographical books, A Long Way from Home (1937) and Harlem: Negro Metropolis (1940). His 1922 book of poetry, Harlem Shadows, was among the first books published during the Harlem Renaissance. His poetry collection, Selected Poems, was published posthumously, in 1953.

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Claude McKay - Unknown Manuscript
... A previously unknown manuscript of a 1941 novel by McKay was authenticated in 2012 ... authenticated the manuscript, and have received permission from the McKay estate to publish the novel, a satire set in 1936, with an introduction about how it was found and its provenance verified ...

Famous quotes containing the words claude mckay, mckay and/or claude:

    If we must die, O let us nobly die,
    So that our precious blood may not be shed
    In vain; then even the monsters we defy
    Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!
    Claude McKay (1889–1948)

    Oh some I know! I have embalmed the days,
    Even the sacred moments when we played,
    All innocent of passion, uncorrupt,
    At noon and evening in the flame-heart’s shade.
    —Claude McKay (1889–1948)

    I was so angry to realize I’m a Quebecois, with no past, no history, just two cans of maple syrup.
    —Jean Claude Lauzon (b. 1954)