Wheatear - Behaviour

Behaviour

Wheatears are terrestrial insectivorous birds of open, often dry, country. They often nest in rock crevices or disused burrows. Northern species are long-distance migrants, wintering in Africa.

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Other articles related to "behaviour, behaviours":

Rosacea - Treatments - Behaviour
... Because sunlight is a common trigger, avoiding excessive exposure to sun is widely recommended ... Some people with rosacea benefit from daily use of a sunscreen others opt for wearing hats with broad brims ...
Internet Addiction Disorder - Related Addictions - Online Gaming Addiction
... operant conditioning claims that the frequency of a given behaviour is directly linked to whether it is rewarded or punished ... If a behaviour is rewarded, it is more likely to be repeated ... ratio reinforcement is the idea that the best way to optimize the desired behaviour in the subject is to hand out rewards for correct behaviour, and then adjust the number of times ...
Trait Ascription Bias - Evidence - Kammer Et. Al.
... Nisbett, which suggests people describe the behaviour of others in terms of fixed dispositions while viewing their own behaviour as the dynamic product of complex situational factors ... intensities (with regard to particular traits) than the behaviour of others ...
White Tern - Behaviour
... This behaviour is unusual for terns, which generally nest on the ground, and even the related tree-nesting Black Noddy constructs a nest ...
Ecological Psychology - Barker
... work "Ecological Psychology" (1968) he argued that human behaviour was radically situated in other words, you couldn't make predictions about human behaviour ... For example, there are certain behaviours appropriate to being in church, attending a lecture, working in a factory etc ... and the behaviour of people in these environments is more similar than the behaviour of an individual person in different environments ...

Famous quotes containing the word behaviour:

    I cannot be much pleased without an appearance of truth; at least of possibility—I wish the history to be natural though the sentiments are refined; and the characters to be probable, though their behaviour is excelling.
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)

    The methodological advice to interpret in a way that optimizes agreement should not be conceived as resting on a charitable assumption about human intelligence that might turn out to be false. If we cannot find a way to interpret the utterances and other behaviour of a creature as revealing a set of beliefs largely consistent and true by our standards, we have no reason to count that creature as rational, as having beliefs, or as saying anything.
    Donald Davidson (b. 1917)

    ... into the novel goes such taste as I have for rational behaviour and social portraiture. The short story, as I see it to be, allows for what is crazy about humanity: obstinacies, inordinate heroisms, “immortal longings.”
    Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973)