What is worked?

Some articles on worked:

Gaston Lachaise - Move To America
... and married Lachaise ) Lachaise emigrated to the United States in 1906 and worked in Boston for H ... In 1912 Lachaise went to New York City and worked as an assistant to the sculptor Paul Manship ... He worked mostly in bronze ...
Dave D. Taylor
... He worked for id Software between 1993 and 1996, and was during the time involved with the development of Doom and Quake ... He founded and worked as president of the small game company Crack dot Com from 1996 to 1998 ... Between 1998 and 2001 he worked for Transmeta ...
Mary Garden
... She worked closely with Jules Massenet, in whose operas she excelled ... Between 1910-1932 Garden worked in several opera houses in Chicago ... She first worked with the Chicago Grand Opera Company (1910–1913) and then joined the Chicago Opera Association in 1915, ultimately becoming the company's director in 1921 ...
John Prescott Ellis - Career
... He then worked on his uncle George H ... in 1979, and later returned to NBC, where he worked for the elections unit ... In the last few years Ellis has worked in investment banking and is a partner in Kerr Creek Partners, and also is a conributing columnist to Real Clear Politics ...
Edwin P. Martz
... He worked with William Pickering at Lowell Observatory in 1937 creating the first color photographs of Mars ... He then worked at the Dearborn Observatory from 1939 until 1941 ... Army and worked on a tracking system for missiles using telescopes ...

Famous quotes containing the word worked:

    I will never accept that I got a free ride. It wasn’t free at all. My ancestors were brought here against their will. They were made to work and help build the country. I worked in the cotton fields from the age of seven. I worked in the laundry for twenty- three years. I worked for the national organization for nine years. I just retired from city government after twelve-and-a- half years.
    Johnnie Tillmon (b. 1926)

    The work of adult life is not easy. As in childhood, each step presents not only new tasks of development but requires a letting go of the techniques that worked before. With each passage some magic must be given up, some cherished illusion of safety and comfortably familiar sense of self must be cast off, to allow for the greater expansion of our distinctiveness.
    Gail Sheehy (20th century)

    Along with the lazy man ... the dying man is the immoral man: the former, a subject that does not work; the latter, an object that no longer even makes itself available to be worked on by others.
    Michel de Certeau (1925–1986)