What is verse?

  • (noun): Literature in metrical form.
    Synonyms: poetry, poesy
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on verse:

Into White
... The first verse has an organically built house - the body ... The second verse is a celebration of all that is outside - the sky, and beautiful and peaceful flora and fauna ... The third verse is of conflict and impending violence drawn against the innocent ...
Verse - Music - Other Uses
... Verse protocol, a networking protocol allowing real-time communication between computer graphics software Verse, a river of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany ...
ODD (Text Encoding Initiative) - The TEI Guidelines - Examples - Verse
... TEI has tags for marking up verse, this example (taken from the French translation of the TEI Guidelines) shows a sonnet Les amoureux fervents et les savants austères ...
Manusmṛti - Structure
... The book is written in simple verse as opposed to the metrical verse of the preceding dharmasutras ... Manu also introduced a unique "transitional verse" which segued the end of one subject and the beginning of the next ...
Pothana - God's Writing
... This is a verse which describes the palace of Lord Vishnu in his divine abode (VAIKUNTHA), at the time the elephant king prayed for the Lord's kindness to deliver him ... The story goes that Pothana wrote the first line of the verse, but could not continue (because he did not know how vaikuntha looks!) ... When he came back in the evening, he saw the verse completed ...

More definitions of "verse":

  • (noun): A line of metrical text.
    Synonyms: verse line
  • (verb): Familiarize through thorough study or experience.
    Example: "She versed herself in Roman archeology"
  • (noun): A piece of poetry.
    Synonyms: rhyme

Famous quotes containing the word verse:

    Show me a man who feels bitterly toward John Brown, and let me hear what noble verse he can repeat. He’ll be as dumb as if his lips were stone.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    There are certain things in which mediocrity is intolerable: poetry, music, painting, public eloquence. What torture it is to hear a frigid speech being pompously declaimed, or second-rate verse spoken with all a bad poet’s bombast!
    —Jean De La Bruyère (1645–1696)

    In verse one can take any damn constant one likes, one can alliterate, or assone, or rhyme, or quant, or smack, only one MUST leave the other elements irregular.
    Ezra Pound (1885–1972)