What is trade wind?

  • (noun): Steady winds blowing from east to west above and below the equator.
    Synonyms: trade

Trade Wind

The trade winds (also called trades) are the prevailing pattern of easterly surface winds found in the tropics, within the lower portion of the Earth's atmosphere, in the lower section of the troposphere near the Earth's equator. The trade winds blow predominantly from the northeast in the Northern Hemisphere and from the southeast in the Southern Hemisphere, strengthening during the winter and when the Arctic oscillation is in its warm phase. Historically, the trade winds have been used by captains of sailing ships to cross the world's oceans for centuries, and enabled European empire expansion into the Americas and trade routes to become established across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, hence the name "Trade Wind".

Read more about Trade Wind.

Some articles on trade wind:

Trade Wind - Weather Effects
... Clouds which form above regions within trade wind regimes are typically composed of cumulus which extend no more than 4 kilometres (13,000 ft) in height, and are capped ... Trade winds originate more from the direction of the poles (northeast in the Northern Hemisphere, southeast in the Southern Hemisphere) during the cold season ... of the Arctic oscillation (AO) is warm, trade winds are stronger within the tropics ...
Climate Of Hawaii - Cloud Formation
... Under trade wind conditions, there is very often a pronounced moisture discontinuity between 4,000 and 8,000 feet (1,200 and 2,400 m) ... High) is caused by a temperature inversion embedded in the moving trade wind air ... On trade wind days when the inversion is well defined, the clouds develop below these heights with only an occasional cloud top breaking through the inversion ...

Famous quotes containing the words wind and/or trade:

    Not I, not I, but the wind that blows through me!
    A fine wind is blowing the new direction of Time.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    ...to many a mother’s heart has come the disappointment of a loss of power, a limitation of influence when early manhood takes the boy from the home, or when even before that time, in school, or where he touches the great world and begins to be bewildered with its controversies, trade and economics and politics make their imprint even while his lips are dewy with his mother’s kiss.
    J. Ellen Foster (1840–1910)